CONSULTATION FEES HIKE: Doctor, heal thyself (of greed)

I WAS reading a report in a local news daily that private doctors are requesting a 30 per cent increase in consultation fees. My immediate thought — has greed infected all of society?

Medicine has always been viewed as a noble and sacred profession, in the sense that ultimately it deals with the most precious commodity, a human being’s life.

We naturally give our full trust to medical practitioners when our loved ones or ourselves are in need of medical attention.

Unfortunately, as much as there are many dedicated doctors who carry out their duties out of passion, there is also a significant number of them who do it for financial rewards.

I have often heard the argument from doctors and non-doctors that to be a doctor, one would need to dedicate one’s life to study, thus, when finally able to practice, the rewards should compensate all the hardship in acquiring the status of a medical practitioner.

This is probably the beginning of the greed factor among doctors.

Read more: http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/consultation-fees-hike-doctor-heal-thyself-of-greed-1.341098#.UhSLH3X_4DA.email

 

Advertisements

HOW INDIAN DOCTORS LOOT PATIENTS

Take note:

This article is said to be written by Professor Hegde, author of What doctors do not study in Medical colleges. I made a search in the internet and learned that this article was not written by Prof Hegde. Someone had used his name to make the writing more credible like the widely circulated Johns Hopkins article. 

On 19-Sep-2012, at 5:00 PM, Prof. B M Hegde wrote:

Dear Sir,

I did not write this article. It is a virus on the net. However, the editor of Moneylife.com has found out that a Bombay journalist wrote it and put my name at the end. She has the details.

================================================================

Wonder how much is widespread and how many are merely a few black sheep.

Most of these observations are either completely or partially true. Corruption has many names, and one of civil society isn’t innocent either. Professionals and businessmen of various sorts indulge in unscrupulous practices. I recently had a chat with some doctors, surgeons and owners of nursing homes about the tricks of their trade. Here is what they said

1) 40-60% kickbacks for lab tests. When a doctor (whether family doctor / general physician, consultant or surgeon) prescribes tests – pathology, radiology, X-rays, MRIs etc. – the laboratory conducting those tests gives commissions. In South and Central Mumbai — 40%. In the suburbs north of Bandra — a whopping 60 per cent! He probably earns a lot more in this way than the consulting fees that you pay.

2) 30-40% for referring to consultants, specialists & surgeons. When your friendly GP refers you to a specialist or surgeon, he gets 30-40%.

3) 30-40% of total hospital charges. If the GP or consultant recommends hospitalization, he will receive kickback from the private nursing home as a percentage of all charges including ICU, bed, nursing care, surgery.

4) Sink tests. Some tests prescribed by doctors are not needed. They are there to inflate bills and commissions. The pathology lab understands what is unnecessary. These are called “sink tests”; blood, urine, stool samples collected will be thrown.

5) Admitting the patient to “keep him under observation”. People go to cardiologists feeling unwell and anxious. Most of them aren’t really having a heart attack, and cardiologists and family doctors are well aware of this. They admit such safe patients, put them on a saline drip with mild sedation, and send them home after 3-4 days after charging them a fat amount for ICU, bed charges, visiting doctors fees.

6) ICU minus intensive care. Nursing homes all over the suburbs are run by doctor couples or as one-man-shows. In such places, nurses and ward boys are 10th class drop-outs in ill-fitting uniforms and bare feet. These “nurses” sit at the reception counter, give injections and saline drips, perform ECGs, apply dressings and change bandages, and assist in the operation theatre. At night, they even sit outside the Intensive Care Units; there is no resident doctor. In case of a crisis, the doctor — who usually lives in the same building — will turn up after 20 minutes, after this nurse calls him. Such ICUs admit safe patients to fill up beds. Genuine patients who require emergency care are sent elsewhere to hospitals having a Resident Medical Officer (RMO) round-the-clock.

7) Unnecessary caesarean surgeries and hysterectomies. Many surgical procedures are done to keep the cash register ringing. Caesarean deliveries and hysterectomy (removal of uterus) are high on the list. While the woman with labour-pains is screaming and panicking, the obstetrician who gently suggests that caesarean is best seems like an angel sent by God! Menopausal women experience bodily changes that make them nervous and gullible. They can be frightened by words like “fibroids” that are in almost every normal woman’s radiology reports. When a gynaecologist gently suggests womb removal “as a precaution”, most women and their husbands agree without a second’s thought.

8) Cosmetic surgery advertized through newspapers. Liposuction and plastic surgery are not minor procedures. Some are life-threateningly major. But advertisements make them appear as easy as facials and waxing. The Indian medical council has strict rules against such misrepresentation. But nobody is interested in taking action.

9) Indirect kickbacks from doctors to prestigious hospitals. To be on the panel of a prestigious hospital, there is give-and-take involved. The hospital expects the doctor to refer many patients for hospital admission. If he fails to send a certain number of patients, he is quietly dumped. And so he likes to admit patients even when there is no need.

10) “Emergency surgery” on dead body. If a surgeon hurriedly wheels your patient from the Intensive Care Unit to the operation theatre, refuses to let you go inside and see him, and wants your signature on the consent form for “an emergency operation to save his life”, it is likely that your patient is already dead. The “emergency operation” is for inflating the bill; if you agree for it, the surgeon will come out 15 minutes later and report that your patient died on the operation table. And then, when you take delivery of the dead body, you will pay OT charges, anaesthesiologist’s charges, blah-blah-

Doctors are humans too. You can’t trust them blindly. Please understand the difference.

11. Young surgeons and old ones. The young ones who are setting up nursing home etc. have heavy loans to settle. To pay back the loan, they have to perform as many operations as possible. Also, to build a reputation, they have to perform a large number of operations and develop their skills. So, at first, every case seems fit for cutting. But with age, experience and prosperity, many surgeons lose their taste for cutting, and stop recommending operations.

12. Physicians and surgeons. To a man with a hammer, every problem looks like a nail. Surgeons like to solve medical problems by cutting, just as physicians first seek solutions with drugs. So, if you take your medical problem to a surgeon first, the chances are that you will unnecessarily end up on the operation table. Instead, please go to an ordinary GP first.

This article above — which is now being circulated in the cyberspace — does carry some lessons  for you to reflect on. Bite and swallow whatever are palatable!

 

Latest Korean fad: Under-eye fat

For most of us, eye bags can be a problem. We go to great lengths to get rid of them.

Not in South Korea, though. Women there are doing everything they can to make the skin under their eyes fatter. The new trend – considered to make you more attractive and youthful-looking – is called “aegyo sal”.

See more at: http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/latest-korean-fad-under-eye-fat/page/0/0#sthash.PSs7djb3.dpuf

Japan university reveals more claims of fabricated drug data

A Japanese university on Wednesday said it would retract a study that touted the effectiveness of a blood pressure drug made by Swiss pharmaceutical giant Novartis because it was based on fabricated data.

The move was the latest chapter in a growing scandal over allegations that bogus data were used in a string of Japanese university studies for the drug Valsartan, which exaggerated its effectiveness in preventing strokes and angina.

Read more: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/health/japan-university-reveals/762106.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter