Antibiotics resistance could kill 10 million a year by 2050

London (AFP) – A British government-commissioned review has found that resistance to antibiotics could account for 10 million deaths a year….

In the United States, antibiotic-resistant infections are associated with 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses each year.

It found the region with the highest number of deaths attributable to antimicrobial resistance would be Asia with 4.7 million, followed by Africa with 4.1 million, while there would be 390,000 in Europe and 317,000 in the United States.

For comparison, the review estimated that the second-biggest killer, cancer, would account for 8.2 million deaths a year by 2050.

“The damaging effects of antimicrobial resistance are already manifesting themselves across the world,” the report said.

“Antimicrobial-resistant infections currently claim at least 50,000 lives each year across Europe and the US alone,” it added.

It warned drug resistance was not “a distant and abstract risk” and called for “a major intervention to avert what threatens to be a devastating burden on the world’s healthcare systems”.

It said that three types of bacteria — the Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus — were already showing signs of resistance to medicine.

Read more: http://news.yahoo.com/antibiotics-resistance-could-kill-10-million-2050-191117894.html

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Author: CA Care

In obedience to God's will and counting on His mercies and blessings, and driven by the desire to care for one another, we seek to provide help, direction and relief to those who suffer from cancer.

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