Can Doctors Choose Between Saving Lives and Saving a Fortune?

By SIDDHARTHA MUKHERJE

America is great, they say! America is medically advanced — they have the best medicine, the best brains, etc. etc. But American is burdened by the most expensive health care cost in the world. Many Americans go bankrupt after being sick — especially after getting medical treatments for their cancer.

We in the developing countries are going to suffer similar fate like the Americans if we follow the so called Great American medical system!

Dr. Siddhartha Mukherje wrote this article in the New York Times.

Can Doctors Choose Between Saving Lives and Saving a Fortune?

To understand something about the spiraling cost of health care in the United States, we might begin with a typical conundrum:

Imagine a 60-something man — a nonsmoker, overweight, with diabetes — who has just survived a heart attack. Perhaps he had an angioplasty, with the placement of a stent, to open his arteries. The doctor’s job is to keep the vessels open.

The doctor has two choices of medicines to reduce the risk for a second heart attack.

  • There’s Plavix, a tried-and-tested blood thinner, that prevents clot formation; the generic version of the drug costs as little as 25 cents a pill.
  • And there’s Brilinta, a newer medicine that is also effective in clot prevention; it costs about $6.50 a pill — 25 times as much.

Brilinta is admittedly more effective than Plavix — by a 2 percentage points.

In a yearlong trial of 18,600 patients, 10 percent died from vascular causes, heart attack or stroke on Brilinta, while about 12 percent did on Plavix.

Should the doctor prescribe the best possible medicine, assuming that the man has private health insurance that will pay the bulk of the costs? Or should the doctor try to conserve health care costs by prescribing the cheaper medicine that is nearly as good?

“We thought about this nearly every day when discharging patients from the cardiology unit,” Dhruv Khullar, a newly minted hospital attending, told me. “Some of us believed that a doctor’s job is to deliver the best possible care.

Others argued that doctors should aim to find some balance between medical benefit, financial cost and social responsibility.

It’s the kind of question that we aren’t really trained to solve. Are costs something that an individual doctor should do something about? What is a doctor supposed to do?”

The authors, Irene Papanicolas, Liana Woskie and Ashish Jha, wrote …. the United States is a sore-thumb outlier among 11 wealthy nations in medical spending. We spend 18 percent of our G.D.P. on health care, while Australia, Canada, Denmark and Japan seem to make do with about half that amount.

Yet life expectancy in the United States is the lowest in the group, and infant mortality is the highest. Our out-of-control prices have a stifling effect on the economy.

So what is driving the cost? Each time we did go to a doctor, it seems, we managed to spend more. Tests were ordered more frequently: We sat inside M.R.I. and CT scanners more often than patients in most other countries.

We had high-cost surgical procedures performed more often than most other populations in the world. Knee replacements, cataract surgeries, cesarean deliveries, coronary-bypass grafts, angioplasty.

On average, though, the United States ranked among the highest in most operations. Many of these procedures cost more in America (an M.R.I. costs $1,150 in the United States and $140 in Switzerland; it’s hard to insist that an American M.R.I. is eight times as good).

And some of these procedures inevitably led to complications, and then we paid for those complications. The impact on overall life expectancy was evidently minimal.

The United States leads developed nations in what the surgeon and writer Atul Gawande has called an epidemic of “overtesting, overdiagnosis and overtreatment.”

If expensive procedures explain some of the costs accrued by Americans, pharmaceutical prices and spending offer an even more alarming explanation. We spent $1,443 annually per person (yes, you read that number right) on drugs — in part because each medicine costs us more, and in part because we used new drugs that weren’t even available in many other countries.

Humira, the treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, was priced at $2,500 per month in the United States versus $980 in Japan and France.

Lantus, the long-acting form of insulin, cost us $186 per month, four times the price in France. Adding pharmaceutical insult to injury, many more expensive drugs were invented in America — and yet we paid more than any other rich nation to use them ourselves.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/03/magazine/can-doctors-choose-between-saving-lives-and-saving-a-fortune.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ma_20180406&nl=magazine&nl_art=0&nlid=54459356emc%3Dedit_ma_20180406&ref=headline&te=1

 

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Author: CA Care

In obedience to God's will and counting on His mercies and blessings, and driven by the desire to care for one another, we seek to provide help, direction and relief to those who suffer from cancer.

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